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According to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) the CO2 concentrations in the Earth’s atmosphere surged to a record high in 2016.

The 50% increase of CO2 last year was higher than the average of the past 10 years, reported.

 

Researchers say a combination of human activities and the El Nino weather phenomenon drove CO2 levels to the point not seen in 800,000 years.

 

Scientists say, this risks making global temperature targets largely unattainable.

 

The WMO produced this year‘s greenhouse gas bulletin based on measurements taken in 51 countries.  Research stations dotted around the globe measure concentrations of warming gases including carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide.

 

Last year average concentrations of CO2 hit 403.3 parts per million, up from 400ppm in 2015, which is largest increase in last 30 years, reported by Dr Oksana Tarasova.

 

“ The largest increase was in 1997-1998 and was 2.7ppm and now it is 3.3ppm.”

 

 

 

Increase of CO2 in the atmosphere causing droughts and drought related change such as limiting ability of plants and trees to grow.

 

Rapidly increasing atmospheric levels of CO2 and other gases have the potential, according to the study to “ initiate unpredictable changes in the climate system leading to severe ecological and economic disruptions.” And experts say, the last time the Earth experienced a comparable concentration of CO@ was three to five million years ago.

 

The climate was 2+3C warmer, and sea levels were 10-20m higher due to the melting of Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets.

 

Today’s CO2 ppm growth causes the concern.  Also, another concern is the report is the continuing mysterious rise of methane level in the atmosphere, which were also lager than the average over the past ten years.

 

The methane growth is strongest in the tropics and sub-tropics, which researchers do not know the reason for it. However the implications of these new atmospheric measurements for the targets agreed under the Paris climate pact, are quite negative, say observers.  

 

 

Eril Solheim head of UN Environment said, “The numbers don’t lie. We are still emitting far too much and this needs to reversed”.

 

“We have many of the solutions already to address this challenge. What we need now is global political will and a new sense of urgency.”

 

The report has been issued just ahead of the next installment of UN climate talks, in Bonn.

 

 





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